Simple tips to Recover Quickly After Sunburn

Ouch! What you thought as a short visit for sunbathing, your skin starts to develop itchy sunburn soon after and boy it didn’t sit well – I mean, people are staring at the awkward patches on your body. Any time that your skin gets exposed to the sun, some may develop a healthy tan (though we don’t agree to the side effects) while another may develop some unsightly burn to the skin. Here’s what you can do to fix it, and provide some impromptu relief. Sun burn doesn’t just exist as mere patches on your skin; they even cause you pain as well. If you do have constant pain in the affected area, take some pain reliever such as ibuprofen to ease the pain as well as the inflammations produced from the burn. The inflammations can also be reduced by applying some cortisone cream. Taking a hot shower when you have sunburn is a big no-no as it will irritate your skin further. Your best bet is to keep your skin (particularly the affected area) ‘cool’ at all times. That includes a cool shower/bath, using a cold compress on the burned skin, or simply applying some menthol/aloe vera gel regularly to soothe the skin (it even reduces the chance of the skin to develop infections). If the skin starts to peel on itself, then it’s safe to do so. Though I don’t mean you can touch the burned skin unnecessarily – you may create skin infections from that habit. Use the gel all the more if the burned skin starts to develop blisters. And don’t pop it – of course, with sterilised tools – unless the blister too large, or it covers at least 20% of your body, consult your doctor ASAP. It’s no brainer, but wearing protective clothing is also essential even if you’re not going out. The key is to protect the burned area from extra irritation (as if the skin hadn’t had enough already). Make sure it’s loose and covers up burned skin and you’ll be fine. And if you do go out, applying a good dose of sunscreen is all the more better. Especially in the sunburnt skin, a dose sunscreen mix with a moisturising lotion will certainly help to soothe and protect your skin. A burnt skin means you need to up your daily water intake all the more, to speed up the repair...
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Cover Up Your Skin In Seconds!

Compared to lipsticks, I would agree that concealer is you must-have  for your whole look because trust me, nobody is that flawless, unless you really eat super healthy and you don’t have any problems, at all. A concealer, just like the name, is needed to conceal any flaw that you have on your face, so you’ll look fresh, awake, and energetic. And what you used to have flesh-toned concealers, there are also colour-correcting ones that work to neutralise any patches of uneven colour on your face. So without further ado, let’s get down to the nitty-gritty, should you have one of the following skin flaw mentioned below. Dark circles or panda eyes – who hasn’t had them? Seriously, nobody wants to see that panda or red, puffy eyes before the conversation even started Contrary what people might think, getting enough sleep is a luxury and with the fast-paced world we’re living, it’s hard – hence you get dark circles . What you need is a yellow-toned concealer with a shade lighter than your current skin tone. Apply some eye cream to plump up the area and wait until it absorbs well into the skin. Dab and tap (not smoothing them over) with a concealer brush until bluish tone from dark circles fade away smoothly and naturally. For extreme panda eyes like Po, a colour-corrector will provide more power – pick pinkish corrector to counteract the green and bluish tones. A good rule; the darker your skin tone, the darker colour corrector would be. Reddish acne pops out of nowhere? Not to worry – after a dab of benzoyl peroxide, cover up with a dab of concealer with the same shade of your skin tone, to even the color out. The same steps also apply if you have acne scar or minor cuts, as it’s still a possibility that you can minimise their appearance. As for wrinkles, a concealer is certainly up for the job. After moisturising your skin, apply concealer by dabbing them onto the area by creamy formulations (powder can settle into wrinkles, making them more noticeable). You can use concealer brush for precise application and to build up coverage, depending on the severity of your wrinkles. Here’s a tip: team them up with some light-diffusing powder to reflect any light from coming at the lines. Sounds simple, doesn’t it the key is to use concealer to hide...
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Hair Bumps. What To Do?

Ingrown hair, also known as “razor bumps,” are a common skin condition, particularly in people whose hair has the tendency to curl back or grow sideways in a hair follicle. The result often looks like acne, consisting of tiny round bumps, some of which have a visible hair trapped inside them. They also can be accompanied by pustules and skin discoloration. Furthermore, they can be painful and itchy as well as cosmetically disfiguring. Women and men with coarse and/or curly hair are more prone to developing this condition, and it is more commonly seen in the African and African-American population, according to Nada Elbuluk, MD, MSc, assistant professor in the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Center, who also practices at NYU’s Joan H. Tisch Center for Women’s Health. Dr. Elbuluk also points out that various types of hair removal — waxing, shaving, plucking and threading — can lead to ingrown hairs. Coaxing hair out of the “bump” at home by poking or tweezing should be avoided, as this can potentially introduce new bacteria into the follicle and worsen the problem. Ingrown hairs that are seriously irritated and/or infected are best treated by a board-certified dermatologist. A dermatologist can also recommend a regimen of anti-bacterial washes and creams as well as topical retinoids that can help treat the area and prevent future ingrown hairs. Over the counter products containing benzoyl peroxide, as well as exfoliating ingredients such as glycolic acid and salicylic acid, also can help in the treatment and prevention of ingrown hairs. “Keeping skin moisturized and exfoliated not only makes it easier to shave, but it can help remove dead skin and hairs that may clog the hair follicles, as well as promote hair growth in the right direction,” says Dr. Elbuluk. Letting hair grow is one option for avoiding the issue of razor bumps. However, if letting hair grow is not an option, Dr. Elbuluk offers some practical tips for dealing with ingrown hairs or razor bumps: Shave in the direction of the hair growth Avoid shaving over the same area multiple times Avoid shaving the hair too close to the skin Shave less often When using a razor blade, make sure the skin is wet before shaving and use a moisturizing shaving cream, gel, or foam while shaving Use of hair-removing creams or clippers instead of blade razors can sometimes help...
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Why you’re So Addicted With Tanning Beds?

Heading out to that tanning bed again? Tsk… Tsk… with all the self-tanner that are available so easily that you can get and yet you still (unintentionally) putting yourself at risk, at the mercy of the tanning salons. Would you believe me if I’d say that you have an addiction to tanning your skin? Read on to find out more. I suppose the tendency of being ‘in love’ with the sun comes from the ancient cultures – Egyptians, Celtic, and Aztecs to name a few – are some of the well-known civilizations that glorified the sun. And now, recent generations have put a twist in it, by using tanning beds or at least sunbathing yourself liberally at the beach. And it comes to a point that the need to have that sun-kissed, golden glow of the skin  that you’d risk yourself to get into tanning beds and/or ditching sunscreens altogether. ‘Tanorexic’ or ‘tanoholic’ are the terms coined for the recent craze of tanning. Although we’re all aware the dangers of overexposing your skin to the sun rays, there’s an increase of skin-related cases reported (majority of them, sadly, is melanoma) with tanning salons are the main factor of the cases, each year. The addiction to tanning is the same as other kinds of addictions, and it’s also complete with withdrawal symptoms (which will make the whole recover process is a bit difficult). Within the addiction to tanning, researchers found that endorphins – producing euphoric feeling – created by exposing oneself to the UV rays may be the cause; in fact, they rose with the increase exposure to the rays. I’m sure you experience it; a good sun ray can make you feel alive and fresh at one point. The study, known as The Wake Forest followed eight people who went to tanning salon frequently to tan their body, with another eight people that are less so; with both groups are given a drug that blocks endorphin production and they’re both instructed to tan in both UV and non-UV tanning beds. The groups who tanned frequently are found to be a-okay with UV tanning beds, but suffered from withdrawal symptoms when using non UV tanning beds. The other groups? They don’t experience any symptoms, whatsoever. The addiction can be explained by our natural instinct that to get the sun exposure needed in order to synthesize vitamin D. While I personally...
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Your Eyelashes Can Age Too!

Believe me, I didn’t expect that that the eyelashes can age to and yes, they do. After a certain age, eventually these eyelashes starts to fall, loses its pigment, volume, and gets thin. So what are we supposed to do? As we age, the estrogen level starts to decline, and apart from affecting your skin, hair, and the youthful glow, your lashes starts to thin, the color gets lighter, and definitely shorter, as opposed to full-bodied volume with thick color to match. Hence a good anti-aging routine that covers all aspects is extremely essential, if you don’t want to look pale and washed out eyes when you get older. The key to stop the lashes from aging is to start early, as soon as possible, just like your usual anti-aging routine. Simply incorporating eyelash care will work wonders for them. So here’s what you should be doing. First things first, if you do wear makeup (especially on regular basis) take off the makeup before you go to sleep. Getting a snooze with mascara still on should be considered as a sin, and they can make your lashes dry, brittle, and prone to fall out a lot easily. And a word for the makeup stuff, if you’re using a lash curler, keep in mind to use a gentle motion when handling a lash curler and not using them in aggressive manner (the eyelashes is so near with your eyes for heaven’s sake). Apply in gentle pressure, with pulsating motion is the way to go. Tip: you can also heat the rubber attached to eyelash curler gently, to provide curling effect, more effectively. Just like your hair and face gets pampered with a weekly mask routine, you really should consider a lash conditioner, to keep them nourish and healthy. Lash conditioners is made just like the name – it conditions, nourishes and repairs any breakage on the lashes. Simply applying them before bed can certainly make your lashes looks so youthful and simply irresistible. Try out lash conditioners available like Jane Iredale, or perhaps use home remedies like castor oil (beneficial for lengthening the lashes) and olive oil for nourishing. If, and only if your lashes look like it’s about to fade into nothingness, you might want to consider Latisse, as for your eyelashes’ life savers. It works by importing the quality of your current lashes, while helping to grow a...
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